Karumba to Porcupine Gorge

img_0334We arrived in Karumba. Actually Karumba point and made camp at the Karumba Holiday and Tourist park. We were warmly welcomed and advised we were in time for the last weekly free fish meal and entertainment night for the season. Just bring drinks, something to go with the fish and a couple dollars for a raffle. How could we resist. I do love a night off from cooking dinner.

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Karumba Holiday and Tourist Park know how to keep the guest’s happy.

We didn’t do a lot in Karumba. The Nichols family were keen to experience one of the famous sunsets over the water, and had dinner at the local pub and enjoyed the setting sun. Alec and myself may of been a little spoilt over the last couple of mouths with sunsets and were happy to have a quiet afternoon and a early night.

While staying at Karumba Point we drove back to Normanton and did a 2 hour trip on the Gulflander. A passenger train service that runs runs between Normanton and Croydon. A distance of 151km. However we didn’t do that trip, but a shorter 2 hour trip. From Normanton and back. Which I must admit, was more than enough as the ride was a bit rough on the old tracks.img_9116

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The Gulflander at our turn around point. More passages boarded for the trip back to Normanton.

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Everyone enjoying the ride. Even if was a bit rough.

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The Gulflander is powered by a 102 horsepower Gardner engine and gets better fuel economy than the Mav.

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The boys loved the croc.

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A little snack.

One the road again our destination was Porcupine Gorge National Park. A overnight stop was required as the distant was to much in a single day. We stayed in the lovely little town of Forsayth and then continued on to Porcupine Gorge.

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As we headed east the country changed from flat plains to hills and rocky out crops.

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A old diesel locomotive in the park at Forsayth.

Porcupine Gorge is a little hidden gem. Hidden it is. With no indication from the surrounding country side that the gorge exists. We stayed 3 night and enjoyed the bush camping, the wonderful views and a cold swim.

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Our camp at Porcupine Gorge National Park.

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Porcupine Gorge from a look out south of our camp.

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A small part of the gorge looking from the start of the walking track.

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The Nichols family completing the walk back up from the gorge.

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A beautiful water hole at the bottom of Porcupine Gorge. A great place for a swim.

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Another shot of the water hole.

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Alec about to take off.

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Us boys enjoying the cool water down in the gorge.

Having enjoying the gorge we left to meet some scary creatures from the distant past.

The Answer’s To The Important Questions

Yes.

Sometimes.

Always.

Only after they left us.

No.

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